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The All-in-One Environment for Civil Engineering: Digging into River-Aquifer Interactions with Mathematica (Spanish)

See how Diego Oviedo-Salcedo, a PhD candidate at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, uses Mathematica to investigate river-aquifer interactions as part of his civil engineering research. Includes Spanish audio.

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Stephane Caraguel
As a quantitative portfolio manager, Stephane Caraguel needs a faster way to develop backtesting trading strategies without relying on the inconsistent toolboxes created by users of open source languages like R.
Guillame Santini and Jean Cognet
As researchers studying theoretical folding models of DNA and RNA, Guillame Santini and Jean Cognet require easy access to predefined mathematics and visualization functions. Mathematica provides a complete work environment for Santini and Cognet, making it ideal for research-related queries. In French.
Frederic Aitken
At the Electrical Engineering Lab of Grenoble, Frederic Aitken studies discharge in insulating liquids in order to understand the defects associated with high-voltage transformers. For Aitken, Mathematica is a powerful tool capable of carrying out analytical calculations and numerical computations with minimal code. Using Mathematica, his team has even developed a calorimetric device to measure dielectric loss. In French.
Philippe Morel
As an associate professor at the School of Architecture Paris-Malaquais, Philippe Morel needs a program that can handle the extremely variable data his architecture students need while still providing room for experimentation. With Mathematica, students can arrive at solutions through different methods. Where once architectural study focused almost solely on geometric modeling, it now includes code handling and algorithm handling. In French.
Maurizo Brocoto
As an instructor at the School of Architecture Paris-Malaquais, the challenge for Maurizio Brocato is finding a program that provides his doctoral students continuity in understanding formal and fundamental viewpoints while maintaining the ability to share results across disciplines. Mathematica is the only program that connects architecture and engineering by combining image, logic, and mathematics functionality into a single solution.
Richard Breheret
One of Richard Breheret's biggest challenges as a high school math teacher is finding a way to help students arrive at answers from different perspectives, whether algebraic or formal, while integrating concepts from primary school to high school. In French.
Alain Carmasol
As associate professor at the National Engineering Institute in Metz, Alain Carmasol needs to present mathematical examples without distracting students from basic concepts and methods. Mathematica allows Carmasol and his students to get back to the basics of analytical approximations and easily implement the concepts in examples.In French.
Jose Luu
As an investment banker at Natixis who runs an internal workshop called BFI Campus, Jose Luu needs a way to teach the difficult concept of local volatility. Mathematica handles all the calculations, making it much faster to compile and execute results. In French.
Francois Roth
Francois Roth describes how he uses Mathematica for data processing, management control, actuary pricing, finance, and results and balances in his role as director of an insurance company. In French with English subtitles.
Thomas Roux and Rémy Fellous
Thomas Roux and his associate Rémy Fellous describe how Mathematica plays an instrumental role in banking, in the assessment of financial risks linked to market activities. In French with English subtitles.
Wolfgang Schmidt
Wolfgang Schmidt, a scientist at the Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, describes how he used Mathematica to calculate, simulate, and analyze designs for new optical components installed in a powerful neutron spectrometer.
Joseph Hirl
Joseph Hirl, founder of Agilis Energy, explains how Mathematica powers energy saving solutions as the core technology behind the company's dynamic energy analysis application.
Fritz Lebowsky
Fritz Lebowsky, a senior principal engineer at STMicroelectronics, describes how he uses Mathematica to develop, test, and communicate new image quality algorithms based on the needs of the company's product developers and customers.
Kenzo Nakamura
Kenzo Nakamura describes how Mathematica inspired him to create mathematics-related art. In Japanese.
Brian Frezza
Brian Frezza describes how Emerald Therapeutics uses Mathematica for all tasks in the company's antiviral research workflow, from developing functions to processing and storing data, designing and managing experiments, presenting findings, and even controlling lab instruments.
Daniel Zicha
See how Daniel Zicha, head of Light Microscopy at Cancer Research UK, uses Mathematica to develop light microscopy techniques for biomedical research in applications of image processing and analysis methods.
Diego Oviedo-Salcedo
See how Diego Oviedo-Salcedo, a PhD candidate at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, uses Mathematica to investigate river-aquifer interactions as part of his civil engineering research.
Diego Oviedo-Salcedo
See how Diego Oviedo-Salcedo, a PhD candidate at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, uses Mathematica to investigate river-aquifer interactions as part of his civil engineering research. Includes Spanish audio.
Eric Schulz
See how mathematics instructor Eric Schulz used CDF to deliver an interactive textbook, giving a new model for visual instruction and learning.
Nathan Myhrvold
Mathematica's graphing capabilities give cookbook author Nathan Myhrvold the right tool to show the science behind cooking techniques, including heat transfer and the growth of pathogens.
Stuart Nettleton
Mathematica's productive programming language, data handling, and scalability has saved Stuart Nettleton, a senior lecturer at the University of Technology, Sydney, years of development time in his research. He describes the advantages in this video.
Paul Abbott
Paul Abbott, a faculty member in the school of physics at the University of Western Australia, uses Mathematica to build courseware, from lectures to exams. His students visualize surfaces, explore concepts interactively, hypothesize results, and check their work—all in Mathematica.
Bruce Torrence
Using Mathematica's Manipulate command to create instant dynamic interfaces dramatically helps students understand mathematics. Bruce Torrence, chair of the department of mathematics at Randolph-Macon College, explains in this video. Includes Spanish audio.
Bruce Torrence
Using Mathematica's Manipulate command to create instant dynamic interfaces dramatically helps students understand mathematics. Bruce Torrence, chair of the department of mathematics at Randolph-Macon College, explains in this video.