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Nick Gaskill
Mathematica can import and export 3D graphics in a variety of standard formats, allowing interchange with other applications. As with other 3D graphics in Mathematica, imported 3D graphics can be rotated and zoomed in and out with a mouse or other input device. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Eric Schulz
Mathematica's slide shows are ideal for use in the classroom and can be leveraged quickly as a lesson or lecture. Any presentation created with Mathematica can display live interactive content that you can alter—and even create—while presenting. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Nick Gaskill
Mathematica provides many options for customizing and annotating plots. Legends can be added to plots and customized with many of the same methods used to customize other Mathematica graphics. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Jeff Bryant
The Wolfram Demonstrations Project provides an easy-to-use template for creating interactive presentations that can be used by anyone with Mathematica or the free Wolfram CDF Player. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Theodore Gray
Mathematica supports using joysticks, gamepads, 3D mice, and all other controller devices that follow the HID specification. This "How to" screencast walks you through how to use a variety of devices to control interactive output in Mathematica.
Using initialization cells, you can specify which input cells of a notebook should be evaluated first. This ensures that your code is evaluated in the correct order, such as defining functions before evaluating cells that use those definitions. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
Faisal Whelpley
Mathematica notebooks consist of sequences of cells, which can be nested. The hierarchy of cells serves as a structure for organizing information in a notebook as well as specifying its overall look. Learn more about creating and working with cells in this "How to" screencast.
John Fultz
Using initialization cells, you can specify which input cells of a notebook should be evaluated first. This ensures that your code is evaluated in the correct order, such as defining functions before evaluating cells that use those definitions. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Chris Hill
One of the most powerful aspects of graphics in Mathematica is their interactivity. Rotating, zooming, and panning your graphics allows for a more complete visualization experience by letting you understand images from every angle and present them from the very best viewpoint. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Mathematica notebooks consist of sequences of cells, which can be nested. The hierarchy of cells serves as a structure for organizing information in a notebook as well as specifying its overall look. Learn more about creating and working with cells in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
One of the most powerful aspects of graphics in Mathematica is interactivity. Rotating, zooming, and panning your graphics allows for a more complete visualization experience by letting you understand images from every angle and present them from the very best viewpoint. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
There are many convenient ways to get an image into Mathematica, including drag-and-drop. You can also import images by evaluating commands in a notebook. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
Faisal Whelpley
While some cells in Mathematica are not visible, they can still be selected for editing and modification. Selecting cells without visible cell brackets works just like selecting their visible counterparts. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Rob Raguet-Schofield
There are many convenient ways to get an image into Mathematica, including drag-and-drop. You can also import images by evaluating commands in a notebook. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Faisal Whelpley
Mathematica notebooks provide a state-of-the-art technical document system as well as being the primary working environment. The tools for creating publication-quality documents include extensive capabilities for formatting and structuring text. Learn more about basic formatting and styling in this "How to" screencast.
David Mitchell
Mathematica allows you to control font sizes of text, math, and graphics for clarity, compactness, or personal preference. You can choose styles for individual characters, whole documents, or application defaults, controlling them according to stylesheets or the output medium. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Mathematica allows you to control font sizes of text, math, and graphics for clarity, compactness, or personal preference. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
Mathematica provides flexible options for labeling plots, allowing you to present ideas more clearly in presentations and publications. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
David Mitchell
Mathematica supports operations on matrices of any size and has a range of input methods appropriate for different needs, from small formatted matrices via keyboard or palettes to text-based entry or automatic import. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Chris Carlson
Mathematica provides flexible options for labeling plots, allowing you to present ideas more clearly in presentations and publications. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Faisal Whelpley
As well as being able to specify colors in several color spaces, Mathematica also contains a variety of predefined colors and aesthetically pleasing color spectrums. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
David Mitchell
You can import spreadsheets created in a variety of formats to take advantage of Mathematica's rich data-manipulation and visualization capabilities. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
When working in Mathematica, you will often find it useful to view groups of functions that relate to a specific subject area or set of tasks. The Documentation Center includes guide pages and the function navigator for this purpose. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
Lou D'Andria
Content in a Mathematica notebook is organized in cells. Each cell has a cell bracket that appears along the right edge of the notebook window. Markings on a cell bracket indicate important information about that cell. Learn more about identifying different cell brackets in this "How to" screencast.