Online Interactive Mathematics/Geometry.

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Online Interactive Mathematics/Geometry.

Postby Matt_James » Sat Oct 08, 2011 5:47 am

Hello everyone,

I am hoping I can use this forum to announce a suggestion (as a layman) and tap into the network of mathematicians.

Firstly I'm not a mathematican of any type, nor do I posses any computer skills. Infact I'm quite bad at both.

However I recently stumbled across a webpage by Professor Poole, where he has put the first four books of Euclid's Elements online in an interactive/visual step-by-step process. I was instantly hooked! Unfortunately he stops at book four though, which is a bit annoying, but here is the link I'm talking about:

http://math.furman.edu/~jpoole/euclidselements/eubk1/props.htm

I'm not sure what computer program was used to create this website, but I find it extremely effective as a learning tool. For some reason I would never of read Euclid step-by-step from a book, but using this website I can follow the reasoning process quite easily. In fact its quite hard not to follow the logic as every step is highlighted in a simple, clear and plain manner (click on any random Proposition to see what I mean).

I would LOVE to be able to use a website like this to learn say, the Conics by Apollonius, or the works of Archimedes or Heron. All those fascinating classic math books I keep reading/hearing about.
As such I'm hoping someone out there in the aether may also have an interest in these classic math texts, as well as have the skills/time to develop something similar to the Euclid site above.

Thanks so much for your time!

Matt
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Re: Online Interactive Mathematics/Geometry.

Postby Kathy_Bautista » Wed Oct 12, 2011 6:11 pm

Matt_James wrote:I would LOVE to be able to use a website like this to learn say, the Conics by Apollonius, or the works of Archimedes or Heron. All those fascinating classic math books I keep reading/hearing about.


Hi Matt! Welcome to the forum!

While they don't cover the complete works of Euclid, Apollonius, Archimedes, or Heron, below are a few pages on MathWorld that explore concepts presented by these mathematicians.


In the sidebar of these pages you'll notice links to several Demonstrations, which will further allow you to explore these concepts using interactive visualizations. These Demonstrations can be viewed in Mathematica or the free CDF Player, both of which include a browser plugin so you can interact with the maniuplates right within the web page.

-Kathy
Katherine Bautista
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