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Beyond the Black Hole
Horizon with Mathematica

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Channels: Technology Conference

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1079 videos match your search.
Sean Cheren
The Wolfram Language is constantly growing the ability to interact with a wide variety of data formats in faster and easier ways. In this talk, we will give details and ...
Tigran Ishkhanyan
The Wolfram Language has over 250 mathematical functions, including well-known elementary and special functions. Most of these mathematical functions might be considered as specific cases of very general superfunctions like the ...
Davit Baghdasaryan and Markus van Almsick
The art of combining overlapping images via image registration and blending is called image stitching. In this talk, you will learn about the improved registration capabilities in the Wolfram Language and how they are utilized to provide powerful stitching capabilities. We will tackle the required types of image transformations, the range of projection setups to obtain a common image canvas and the different blending techniques to get seamless results. Join the fun in creating large scans, panoramas ...
Nina Dokeva
Constrained optimization algorithms have been under active development in recent years, with numerous open-source and commercial library solvers emerging for convex, nonconvex, local and global optimization. This talk will cover the Wolfram Language numerical optimization functions for constrained local and global optimization, how they classify and process the inputs into the form required by different solvers and the increasing availability of solvers that can be called through ...
Paritosh Mokhasi
In the field of optimization, convex optimization holds special status because of its property that the minimum is always a global minimum and there are highly efficient solvers available to solve convex problems. However, not all optimization problems can be formulated as purely convex problems. This talk will focus on generalizations of the convex optimization algorithms that allow us to ...
Unal Goktas
An overview of solution methods for partial differential equations (PDEs) in the Wolfram Language and how these tools can be used to understand and learn PDEs will be presented. We will show examples of the methods in play as they are being used in the Wolfram Language, and give insight into the key ideas and algorithms supported by graphics illustrations. The talk ...
Antti Rasila
In this presentation, we discuss numerical computation of harmonic and quasiconformal mappings, which are natural generalizations of conformal mappings. In particular, Gerhard Opfer developed a method of efficiently constructing conformal mappings onto starlike domains, using variations on extremal properties for conformal mappings onto disks. This method was later extended by D. Bshouty et al. to numerical computation univalent harmonic mappings onto starlike domains. We will further develop the theory behind this result, and then apply it to example problems. Theoretical background of the method and numerical computation of ...
Bob Sandheinrich
Distribution of data, neural networks and functions throughout Wolfram Language environments is enabled by the Wolfram Resource System—and now full paclets too! Find out how to both use and ...
Itai Seggev
Mathematica has always been a powerful tool for doing calculus and other computations of lower-division college mathematics. While powerful, certain design choices were made that reflected the point of view of the mathematical expert and not the point of view of the student or the introductory mathematics classroom. Over the last several versions, we have revisited some of these choices to better align Mathematica with the classroom. For example, Limit now computes two-sided limits by default, Integrate can return "constants" of integration and there are dedicated functions for determining function monotonicity and convexity. The documentation has been greatly expanded, including examples based on problems that might appear in an introductory course. This allows students to connect the functions they are using in Mathematica with the content ...
József Konczer
Game theory was originally proposed to model the economic behavior of rational agents. Besides the introduction of influential concepts in economics and finance, it provided useful tools in other human-related ...
Tom Wickham-Jones
The Wolfram Compiler is a long-term project for the compilation of Wolfram Language programs. It converts Wolfram Language into native machine code and provides a faster execution path as well as many opportunities for innovative programming features. It is used for an increasing amount of new features in the Wolfram Language. This talk will cover advanced programming with the Wolfram Compiler, with a focus on performance computing. It will show the latest features that work with Wolfram grid computing as well ...
Anshu Manik
Wolfram Technical Consulting works with users to leverage Wolfram technologies to automate processes, design and train new machine learning/AI models, develop custom applications, implement innovative algorithms, run deep data ...
Oliver Reubenkoenig
Solid mechanics deals with the deformation of objects under applied forces. This talk will describe how to create solid mechanics models in the Wolfram Language. The resulting partial differential equations (...
Brenton Bostick
The notebook front end is a great tool for developing Wolfram Language, but there are other editors and IDEs that users may want to use. I will demonstrate new integration ...
Charles Pooh
Suba Thomas and Sergio Vargas
The Wolfram Language has been enhanced with several features to enable better integration of system modeling and to automate and streamline the subsequent controller design and simulation. These improvements include the capability to work directly with models created in System Modeler, compute controllers for both regulation and tracking, automatically assemble closed-loop systems, generate controllers for deployment to hardware and much more. This talk will present these developments along with a System Modeler application examples demonstrating ...
Anton Antonov
Last year, at WTC-2020, I gave a presentation titled "Multi-language Data Wrangling Conversational Agent". A natural extension of that work is making a Conversational Agent (CA) for Data Acquisition Workflows (DAWs). A closely related problem domain is the acquisition of Machine Learning (ML) models. (For example neural nets models.) In this presentation we discuss the design of a ...
Kunal Khadke and Jayanta Phadikar
Wolfram Notebooks provide an enriched, aesthetically pleasing and highly customizable environment for authoring computational essays, presentations, articles, books and so on. We will discuss various best practices for developing notebook-based publications, including dealing with Manipulate input cells, formatting Manipulate output cells and figures, creating a table of contents, 2D typesetting, referencing between different sections and so on. We will illustrate and provide various palettes and code snippets for implementing such ideas. The content has been created based on authors' prior involvement in creating Wolfram U course contents, consulting on customer projects and studies of previous notebook-based ...
Matteo Fasano and Ankit Naik
How can you make teaching come alive and be more engaging? For many educators, the answer turns out to be not so much a single solution, but rather a set of tools that can vary according to the subject and even by student. So today, I want to add something new to the pedagogical toolkit: Wolfram Virtual Labs. Wolfram Virtual Labs are open educational resources in the form of interactive courseware that are used to explain different concepts in the classroom. My ambition is to provide an easy way to study difficult concepts and promote student curiosity. Recently, I have been using these labs for my thermal engineering courses. It is particularly useful for remote teaching to a class of 300 students during COVID-19. I will share my experiences and introduce applications ...
James Boyd
Examined herein is the possible correspondence between computational complexity classes in computational graphs and higher homotopy classes between computability paths via the application of two methods. The first method is the use of category theory for formalizing a model of (categorified) graphical Turing machines with a forgetful functor to a "computability \[Infinity]-group" (not a groupoid), which expresses computability in a manner that affords even greater abstraction than a Turing machine. The second method is the application of Homotopy Type Theory (HoTT) to the study of the properties of higher homotopy classes between machines (which are themselves simulations executed by higher machines), with the ultimate goal of calculating homotopy types that express invariances of computability (which is our abstract interpretation of the role of complexity classes). We conclude that such methods may make possible the formalization of 'higher complexity classes' and 'higher n-machines' currently unrepresented in theoretical computer science and computational complexity theory. The possibility of formalization as such can be investigated understood through ...