Wolfram Screencast & Video Gallery

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This video gives a quick introduction to Wolfram's Computable Document Format (CDF) by highlighting how computation brings documents to life. In Japanese.
Markus van Almsick
In this video, Markus van Almsick explains why he chose Mathematica for a project to design safe children's playground equipment. Includes Japanese audio.
The Mathematica help system works with a highly structured set of documents. Each document falls into one of a number of categories, the most important of which are guide pages, reference pages, and tutorials. This screencast gives an overview of Mathematica's help system. Includes Japanese audio.
Anmol Bajracharya
Wolfram Finance Platform injects ultimate computation into finance workflows. Learn about its new features in this talk from the Wolfram Finance Platform Virtual Seminar.
Andrew Hull
This video features Mathematica user Andrew Hull, who explains how Mathematica is used to develop eco-friendly biofuel solutions. Includes Japanese audio.
Yves Papegay
In this video, Yves Papegay of INRIA describes how he uses Mathematica to apply symbolic computation coding methods to flight modeling and simulation applications. Includes Japanese audio.
Richard Scott
This video, featuring Richard Scott of CDx Laboratories, gives an example of how Mathematica is used to prevent cancer with precision diagnosis. Includes Japanese audio.
Frank Scherbaum
Geophysics professor Frank Scherbaum walks through an example of how he used Mathematica to develop an integrated system for students, teachers, and researchers to use in their probabilistic seismic hazard analysis work. Includes Japanese audio.
Nick Lariviere
Report Generation allows you to create documents quickly and easily using Wolfram Finance Platform documents. Get an overview of the features in this talk from the Wolfram Finance Platform Virtual Seminar.
This tutorial screencast encourages users to work along in Mathematica 7 as they learn the basics to create their first notebook, calculations, visualizations, and interactive examples. Includes Japanese audio.
Mathematica offers great flexibility for adding text to graphics; you can add text interactively using the Drawing Tools palette or programmatically using various graphics primitives. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
Mathematica lets you create your own custom interfaces, using its uniquely straightforward, symbolic interface-building technology. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
Mathematica can run its calculations on other computers that have Mathematica installed. Passing computations to other, potentially more powerful, machines can increase the efficiency of your work. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
Mathematica notebooks consist of sequences of cells, which can be nested. The hierarchy of cells serves as a structure for organizing information in a notebook as well as specifying its overall look. Learn more about creating and working with cells in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
You may want to export data from Mathematica to a spreadsheet. Excel is one example of a common spreadsheet format that Mathematica supports. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
Mathematica provides several convenient ways to find information about functions. In addition to searching the documentation or navigating the guide pages, you can access documentation on functions directly from within your notebook. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
When working in Mathematica, you will often find it useful to view groups of functions that relate to a specific subject area or set of tasks. The Documentation Center includes guide pages and the function navigator for this purpose. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
There are many convenient ways to get an image into Mathematica, including drag-and-drop. You can also import images by evaluating commands in a notebook. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
Mathematica provides flexible options for labeling plots, allowing you to present ideas more clearly in presentations and publications. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
Mathematica allows you to control font sizes of text, math, and graphics for clarity, compactness, or personal preference. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
One of the most powerful aspects of graphics in Mathematica is interactivity. Rotating, zooming, and panning your graphics allows for a more complete visualization experience by letting you understand images from every angle and present them from the very best viewpoint. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
Mathematica allows Greek letters to be integrated into symbol names, strings, graphics, and text. You can input Greek letters by using palettes or keyboard shortcuts. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
Palettes give you immediate access to many features built into Mathematica, from creating syntactically complete expressions and inserting special characters to building up charts and slide shows, all through a convenient point-and-click interface. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
Using initialization cells, you can specify which input cells of a notebook should be evaluated first. This ensures that your code is evaluated in the correct order, such as defining functions before evaluating cells that use those definitions. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.