Wolfram Technology Conference 2011—October 19–21, 2011 | Wolfram Headquarters, Champaign, Illinois, USA

PRESENTATIONS AND TALKS

VIDEOS

Mathematica 8 Year in Review

with Roger Germundsson, John Fultz, and Tom Wickham-Jones

Mathematica as a Tool in the Sexy World of ebooks

with Theo Gray

Both a Logo and an Exhibit: Mathematica and the Museum of Mathematics Logo Concept

with Chris Carlson

The forthcoming Museum of Mathematics doesn't have a logo. It has an infinite family of logos implemented with Mathematica. The logos the museum actually uses will be designed by its visitors, and will be continually changing. Hear how the concept came about, how it is being put to use, and what the challenges have been in implementing it.

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Applications of GPU Computation in Mathematica

with Ulises Cervantes-Pimentel

Robots, LEGO, and Mathematica

with Lambert Chao/Kamilah J.M. Taylor

In this talk we show new Mathematica capabilities for remotely communicating with and controlling the LEGO MINDSTORMS NXT 2.0 robot. We will demonstrate ways to use Mathematica to acquire, process, and visualize sensor data and use that information to control the NXT's behavior.

Mobile Computing in the Classroom

with Nikki Johnson

Imagine the power of Mathematica and Wolfram|Alpha on a mobile device: these tools are allowing for a more fun and dynamic classroom. Explore the various ways mobile devices can enhance learning in math, science, and even music classrooms. Through a variety of examples, you will see the benefits of mobile computing technology in your class.

Integrating C and Mathematica

with Joel Klein/Todd Gayley

Today's system builder expects tools to play together and to deploy applications easily. In this talk you will understand how and when to use new Mathematica 8 features for C language integration. Soon you'll be calling native C functions and libraries from Mathematica, accelerating your CompiledFunctions, and generating standalone applications from your Mathematica algorithms.

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An Engineer's Box of Chocolates

with Yves Klett
Institute of Aircraft Design & University of Stuttgart, Germany

While mechanical engineers certainly are responsible for huge amounts of computation, their approach to doing math can be somewhat practical: they need some way to get things done (and please, no metaphysical debates about error representations of floating point numbers, because there in fact is a deadline for this car/airplane/rocket/toaster crash test). Especially in R&D, one is faced with all kinds of ever-changing tasks involving dirty real-world processes that obstinately refuse to behave according to theory (and sometimes depend more on the day of the week and the weather than on calculation), but still need to be dealt with. Thus the box of chocolates analogy: sometimes you really don't know what you're going to get—but you'd better get it done by next week, thank you very much, chop-chop. On the plus side, no one is going to fire you because you used a horribly inefficient root-finding method (as long as it works, that is). Because many of those tasks do involve really non-standard problems and processes, you need a flexible, rapidly deployable tool. As it turns out, Mathematica does exceptionally well here. We'll present a few select examples where we make particularly good use of Mathematica in everyday (and not so everyday) research, ranging from test data analysis to computational origami.

Effective Use of the Mathematica Compiler and Code Generation

with Rob Knapp

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BigData: Demystifying Large Datasets in Mathematica

with Nick Lariviere

This talk examines a number of data import themes and breaks down how Mathematica handles large datasets in real-world applications. Topics include import performance with various data formats and types and improvements in future versions of Mathematica, in an attempt to demystify operations involving very large data files for both personal and high-performance machines.

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Automatic Parallelism

with Roman Maeder

A look at advanced features of Mathematica's parallel programming language, including automatic distribution of values to parallel kernels and automatic parallelization of programs.

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Social Network Analysis

with Charles Pooh

Sharing Wisdom Gained from Publishing a CDF ebook

with Eric Schulz

The print version of Calculus: Early Transcendentals, by Briggs, Cochran, Gillett, and Schulz, Addison-Wesley/Pearson Education, contains almost 1,000 pages. The electronic version of the complete text was created from scratch as a Computable Document Format (CDF) ebook composed of 113 files, collectively containing 648 interactive figures. Navigation between any two sections of the ebook and to specific items within a section requires only two mouse clicks. The CDF ebook is distributed to thousands of students enrolled at hundreds of colleges directly from Pearson's MyMathLab website. The presenter is the author of the CDF ebook and will share wisdom gained from the experience of designing, creating, managing, and publishing the electronic version of Calculus.

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Getting the Most from Algebraic Solvers in Mathematica

with Adam Strzebonski

This talk will give a survey of Mathematica functions related to solving algebraic equations and inequalities. It will also discuss the choice of the most appropriate solvers for various types of problems and the ways of formulating the problems so that they can be solved most efficiently.

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computerbasedmath.org

with Conrad Wolfram

computerbasedmath.org is a project started by Conrad Wolfram to build a completely new math curriculum with computer-based computation at its heart—alongside a campaign to refocus math education away from historical hand-calculating techniques and toward relevant and conceptually interesting topics. This talk will be a briefing on the concept, progress, and plans—including for the upcoming London summit in November.

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