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John Fultz
Mathematica notebooks support a variety of input and output styles. You can write input using the characters from the standard keyboard. Alternately, you can write input in more familiar mathematical notation using the front-end palettes or keyboard shortcuts. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Chris Carlson
Mathematica's interactive graphics capabilities let you determine the coordinates of a single point. You can also get arbitrary sequences of points and paths and analyze and manipulate the coordinate lists like any other data in Mathematica. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Mathematica provides several convenient ways to find information about functions. In addition to searching the documentation or navigating the guide pages, you can access documentation on functions directly from within your notebook. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
Faisal Whelpley
Mathematica notebooks can have headers and footers that are displayed when the notebook is printed but hidden when it's onscreen. Headers and footers can contain fixed text or dynamic objects such as page numbers and dates or even arbitrary dynamic Mathematica expressions. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Mathematica lets you create your own custom interfaces, using its uniquely straightforward, symbolic interface-building technology. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
David Mitchell
Mathematica usually works silently, giving output only when it has finished doing the calculations you asked for. However, Mathematica will produce an audible beep when the front end encounters an error. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
David Mitchell
Mathematica can run its calculations on other computers that have Mathematica installed. Passing computations to other, potentially more powerful, machines can increase the efficiency of your work. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Nick Gaskill
Mathematica's built-in spell checker includes the ability to customize spelling dictionaries both permanently and for individual notebooks. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Mathematica lets you create your own custom interfaces, using its uniquely straightforward, symbolic interface-building technology. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
Lou D'Andria
Mathematica allows Greek letters to be integrated into symbol names, strings, graphics, and text. You can input Greek letters by using palettes or keyboard shortcuts. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Mathematica can run its calculations on other computers that have Mathematica installed. Passing computations to other, potentially more powerful, machines can increase the efficiency of your work. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
Lou D'Andria
Palettes give you immediate access to many features built into Mathematica, from creating syntactically complete expressions and inserting special characters to building up charts and slide shows, all through a convenient point-and-click interface. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Chris Carlson
Mathematica's unified symbolic graphics architecture makes it possible to mix programmatic graphics generation with interactive editing and control. The Mathematica Drawing Tools palette lets you edit existing plots or illustrations—or create free-form ones from scratch. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
David Mitchell
You may want to export data from Mathematica to a spreadsheet. Excel is one example of a common spreadsheet format that Mathematica supports. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
David Mitchell
You may want to export a graphic for use outside Mathematica. You have a large set of choices of raster and vector formats. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Chris Carlson
Whether for simple annotation or to produce publication-quality plots, adding text outside the area of plots is one of many customization features that Mathematica provides to help you tailor plots to your needs. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Chris Carlson
Mathematica offers great flexibility for adding text to graphics; you can add text interactively using the Drawing Tools palette or programmatically using various graphics primitives. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Mathematica offers great flexibility for adding text to graphics; you can add text interactively using the Drawing Tools palette or programmatically using various graphics primitives. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
Palettes give you immediate access to many features built into Mathematica, from creating syntactically complete expressions and inserting special characters to building up charts and slide shows, all through a convenient point-and-click interface. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
Mathematica allows Greek letters to be integrated into symbol names, strings, graphics, and text. You can input Greek letters by using palettes or keyboard shortcuts. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
You may want to export data from Mathematica to a spreadsheet. Excel is one example of a common spreadsheet format that Mathematica supports. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.