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How to Use the Suggestions Bar

Get a quick overview of how to use the Suggestions Bar, a new interface paradigm that lets you navigate and discover functionality throughout the Mathematica system.

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Chris Carlson
Whether for simple annotation or to produce publication-quality plots, adding text outside the area of plots is one of many customization features that Mathematica provides to help you tailor plots to your needs. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Chris Carlson
Mathematica offers great flexibility for adding text to graphics; you can add text interactively using the Drawing Tools palette or programmatically using various graphics primitives. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Mathematica offers great flexibility for adding text to graphics; you can add text interactively using the Drawing Tools palette or programmatically using various graphics primitives. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
Nick Gaskill
All bracketing characters in Mathematica must be balanced. The Mathematica front end contains several convenient tools that let you make sure your brackets and braces are balanced. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Mathematica lets you create your own custom interfaces, using its uniquely straightforward, symbolic interface-building technology. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Mathematica lets you create your own custom interfaces, using its uniquely straightforward, symbolic interface-building technology. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
Nick Gaskill
In addition to letting you change the size of points in a 2D plot, Mathematica also lets you change the color and type of marker for points. Learn how in this "How to" screencast.
David Mitchell
Mathematica can run its calculations on other computers that have Mathematica installed. Passing computations to other, potentially more powerful, machines can increase the efficiency of your work. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Mathematica can run its calculations on other computers that have Mathematica installed. Passing computations to other, potentially more powerful, machines can increase the efficiency of your work. Learn more in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
Jeff Bryant
The Wolfram Demonstrations Project provides an easy-to-use template for creating interactive presentations that can be used by anyone with Mathematica or the free Wolfram CDF Player. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Faisal Whelpley
Mathematica's powerful core symbolic architecture allows sophisticated interactive interfaces to be created from single lines of input. Learn more about creating dynamic interfaces in this "How to" screencast.
Eric Schulz
Mathematica's slide shows are ideal for use in the classroom and can be leveraged quickly as a lesson or lecture. Any presentation created with Mathematica can display live interactive content that you can alter—and even create—while presenting. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
You can create and present slide shows directly from within Mathematica. Mathematica-based presentations can contain interactive interfaces and live computations, letting your audience see the effects of changes to parameters in real time. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Faisal Whelpley
Mathematica notebooks consist of sequences of cells, which can be nested. The hierarchy of cells serves as a structure for organizing information in a notebook as well as specifying its overall look. Learn more about creating and working with cells in this "How to" screencast.
Mathematica notebooks consist of sequences of cells, which can be nested. The hierarchy of cells serves as a structure for organizing information in a notebook as well as specifying its overall look. Learn more about creating and working with cells in this "How to" screencast. Includes Japanese audio.
John Fultz
Using initialization cells, you can specify which input cells of a notebook should be evaluated first. This ensures that your code is evaluated in the correct order, such as defining functions before evaluating cells that use those definitions. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Faisal Whelpley
Mathematica can collect, process, and display data dynamically and in real time. A large collection of curated data is built into Mathematica, which puts an extraordinary amount of information at your fingertips. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Nick Gaskill
The time it takes Mathematica to perform a computation is important information that can help you write efficient programs. Conveniently, you can display the time elapsed for your most recent computation in the lower-left corner of your notebook. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
Faisal Whelpley
Mathematica notebooks provide a state-of-the-art technical document system as well as being the primary working environment. The tools for creating publication-quality documents include extensive capabilities for formatting and structuring text. Learn more about basic formatting and styling in this "How to" screencast.
Chris Carlson
Mathematica's unified symbolic graphics architecture makes it possible to mix programmatic graphics generation with interactive editing and control. The Mathematica Drawing Tools palette lets you edit existing plots or illustrations—or create free-form ones from scratch. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
You can embed interactive Wolfram Demonstrations on your website or blog in just a few quick steps. Learn how in this "How to" screencast.
This tutorial screencast shows how to encrypt your code for deployment using the Encode command on a package.
John Fultz
Mathematica notebooks support a variety of input and output styles. You can write input using the characters from the standard keyboard. Alternately, you can write input in more familiar mathematical notation using the front-end palettes or keyboard shortcuts. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.
David Mitchell
You may want to export data from Mathematica to a spreadsheet. Excel is one example of a common spreadsheet format that Mathematica supports. Learn more in this "How to" screencast.