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Using Wolfram to Find and Analyze Unstructured Data

Over the last five years, SDGCounting has used the Wolfram technology stack to track and report on progress made around the UN's sustainable development goals (SDGs). As the capabilities of Wolfram have evolved, our methodologies and uses have evolved as well. In this presentation, we explore our work in 2020, which was focused on turning unstructured information into data. Specific topics include: automation of data gathering; turning narratives and reports into usable data; using Wolfram to make your ongoing topic research easier; tips and tricks for optimizing searches; and data import.​ ​​ ​The year 2020 is the fifth year of the SDG | Global Goals 15-year plan—2020 to 2030 had been designated as the Decade of Action to try to get on track toward achievement of defined targets by 2030. But the COVID pandemic is causing great disruption—estimates are that for many goals, there may be a 10-year+ setback. Country statistical offices are closed; data collection, already lagging by up to three years in many cases, is a mess. To get back on track will require augmentation of traditional United Nations counting methods with new methods relying on more contemporaneous—and less structured—sources of information. Over the past five years we have used Wolfram technology on most of our SDG projects, for example to integrate UN data with Wolfram entities and to explore and analyze social media around SDGs.​ ​​ ​SDGCounting on Medium: https://sdgcounting.medium.com/

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Ambar Jain, Ph.D.
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Brenton Bostick
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Ben Kickert, Maureen Baehr
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Jeremy Stratton-Smith, AnneMarie Torresen
For over 10 years now, Wolfram|Alpha has been building on top of the kernel functionality of the Wolfram Language to provide easy access to computational knowledge. With the release of Wolfram|Alpha Notebook Edition in fall 2019, there are new possibilities for integrating computational thinking via the natural language processing power of Wolfram|Alpha. To further expand on these possibilities and increase educational accessibility, we have added a new data paclet, Educational Standards Data, and created new Common Core–aligned example pages. This talk covers the work that has been done to incorporate the Common Core math standards into ...
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Jose Martin-Garcia
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Rob Knapp
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Maureen Baehr, Ben Kickert
Over the last five years, SDGCounting has used the Wolfram technology stack to track and report on progress made around the UN's sustainable development goals (SDGs). As the capabilities of Wolfram have evolved, our methodologies and uses have evolved as well. In this presentation, we explore our work in 2020, which was focused on turning unstructured information into data. Specific topics include: automation of data gathering; turning narratives and reports into usable data; using Wolfram to make your ongoing topic research easier; tips and tricks for optimizing searches; and data import.​ ​​ ​The year 2020 is the fifth year of the SDG | Global Goals 15-year plan—2020 to 2030 had been designated as the Decade of Action to try to get on track toward achievement of defined targets by 2030. But the COVID pandemic is causing great disruption—estimates are that for many goals, there may be a 10-year+ setback. Country statistical offices are closed; data collection, already lagging by up to three years in many cases, is a mess. To get back on track will require augmentation of traditional United Nations counting methods with new methods relying on more contemporaneous—and less structured—sources of information. Over the past five years we have used Wolfram technology on most of our SDG projects, for example to integrate UN data with ...
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Nicholas Brunk, PSM, MS
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