From our origins in mathematical and technical computing, Wolfram technologies have gradually emerged as a major force in many other areas of computing. Passionate individuals and organizations have played a major role in helping advance the usage of our technologies. We recognize these deserving recipients with the Wolfram Innovator Award, which is awarded at the Wolfram Technology Conferences around the world.

Innovator Award
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Richard Gaylord is one of Mathematica’s earliest users and is a self-described evangelist for the Wolfram Language. He taught computer programming in the Wolfram Language at many universities, companies, government agencies, and scientific conferences for more than 25 years. He has co-authored several texts, including An Introduction to Programming with Mathematica, and three other books on programming computer simulations in a wide variety of fields using the Wolfram Language. Gaylord has made a three-part video explaining the fundamentals of the Wolfram Language.

Prof. Richard J. Gaylord
2012 Dr. Kazuhiro Iwadoh Tokyo Women's Medical University Areas: Biology, Data Mining and Analysis, Risk Analysis

Dr. Kazuhiro Iwadoh is a medical doctor who studies biostatistics at Tokyo Women’s Medical University. He constructed a decision-making support system in Mathematica to estimate the possibility of injury to a transplanted organ by determining examining parameters that could change over time. The end result is a program that displays an array of a patient’s information such as prescription history and other factors, allowing the physician to select a treatment option tailored to the patient. Dr. Iwadoh hopes the system will contribute to a higher rate of success in organ transplants and for medical procedures in general.

Learn more about Kazuhiro Iwadoh's work »
Dr. Kazuhiro Iwadoh
2012 Robert B. Nachbar Mathematician, Chemist, Biologist, Modeling & Simulation; Merck Research Laboratories Areas: Biology, Biotechnology, Pharmaceutical

Robert Nachbar is recognized for using Mathematica at Merck. He was instrumental in the Gardasil HPV vaccine project, turning a research-grade model created by his coworkers Elamin Elbasha and Erik Dasbach into a production-grade simulation package. Robert is responsible for the Wolfram|Alpha trial at Merck, has used Mathematica frequently in his research on viral dynamics for the hepatitis C virus, and has modeled clinical trial data.

Robert B. Nachbar