Wolfram Computation Meets Knowledge

Wolfram Innovator Award

Wolfram technologies have long been a major force in many areas of industry and research. Leaders in many top organizations and institutions have played a major role in using computational intelligence and pushing the boundaries of how the Wolfram technology stack is leveraged for innovation across fields and disciplines.

We recognize these deserving recipients with the Wolfram Innovator Award, which is awarded at the Wolfram Technology Conferences around the world.

2019

Todd Feitelson

Math Teacher, Millbrook School

Areas: 3D Printing, Computer Graphics and Visual Arts, Mathematics, Mathematics Courseware Design

Todd Feitelson teaches mathematics at Millbrook School in Millbrook, New York, and has been using Mathematica to build a new hands-on curriculum for his high-school students. His unique projects and problem sets bring math to life, using the Wolfram Language’s 3D modeling and printing capabilities to design and print polyhedrons, chessboards, rockets and more. Feitelson has presented his results at several conferences, showcasing Mathematica’s usefulness for creating these interactive problem sets.

2019

Chris Hanusa

Associate Professor of Mathematics, PhD, CUNY Queens College

Areas: 3D Printing, Computer Graphics and Visual Arts, Mathematics, Mathematics Courseware Design

Chris Hanusa is a professor at Queens College in Queens, New York, teaching classes on calculus, mathematical modeling, graph theory and more. He makes extensive use of Mathematica to help his students with complex calculations and for visualizing difficult concepts. In his Math with Mathematica course, Hanusa works with students on several Mathematica-based projects, including 3D modeling and printing. He gives regular talks on teaching with Mathematica, emphasizing the importance of the Wolfram Language’s 3D printing capabilities.

2019

Dr. Joo-Haeng Lee

Senior Research Scientist, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute

Areas: Computer Graphics and Visual Arts, Computer Science, Machine Learning

Dr. Joo-Haeng Lee is a researcher specializing in human-machine interaction, robotics and computational art. He has used Mathematica to develop several unique geometric algorithms for camera calibration and Bézier curves/surfaces. Most recently, he utilized the Wolfram Language to develop PixelSwap, an algorithm for pixel-based color transition that can be used for both aesthetic images and synthetic learning sets for deep learning. Dr. Lee regularly uses Mathematica visualization for technical illustrations and his artworks for exhibitions.

2019

Flip Phillips

Professor of Motion Picture Science, Rochester Institute of Technology

Areas: Computational Humanities, Computational Thinking, Computer Graphics and Visual Arts, Education, Machine Learning

Flip Phillips is a professor, researcher and former Pixar animation scientist who uses Wolfram technology to integrate real-world computation into his psychology and neuroscience curriculum. Through his course, students get unique hands-on experience with computational thinking and machine learning, completing cross-disciplinary projects ranging from predicting voter behavior to identifying fruit from sensor readings. Phillips makes use of Wolfram connected devices for gathering data and frequently publishes his work in the Wolfram Cloud. He has used Mathematica extensively for his research on perception, psychological aesthetics and cortical plasticity. He has also written several packages for extending the Wolfram Language’s rendering capabilities.

2014

Bruce Torrence

Randolph-Macon College

Areas: Authoring and Publishing, Authoring in Mathematica, Computer Graphics and Visual Arts, Computer-Aided Education, Education, Mathematics

Bruce Torrence is the author of numerous Mathematica books and articles including The Student’s Introduction to Mathematica, a popular general reference book for students and educators. In addition to publishing dozens of articles on the use of Mathematica in education and research, Torrence recently completed a five-year editorship at Math Horizons and is a Wolfram Science Summer School alumni.

2012

W. Craig Carter

Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, MIT

Areas: Computer Graphics and Visual Arts, Control Engineering, Materials Science

W. Craig Carter is recognized for his many uses of Mathematica over the years, starting with his PhD studies. He has tutored other MIT faculty with course examples in Mathematica to help their work, from the project planning stage forward. Craig has also used Mathematica for many years in his course “Mathematics for Materials Science and Engineers.” Craig’s achievements using Mathematica in his research include prototyping an idea with a start-up company to create a new type of battery. He also used Wolfram technology to collaborate on and help design an art piece feature at the Pompidou in Paris.

See W. Craig Carter's Mathematica Demonstrations »

2011

Steve Bush

The Procter & Gamble Company

Areas: Computer Graphics and Visual Arts, Industrial Engineering, Physics

In Steve Bush’s role developing household consumer items at The Procter & Gamble Company, he’s involved in the physics behind products as well as their economic feasibility. His work with Mathematica includes developing sophisticated tools for computer-aided design and optimizing the orifice size needed to maximize jet momentum, as well as setting up an efficient workflow from idea to prototype.

Hear Steve Bush talk about optimizing face gear surfaces »

2011

Stan Wagon

Macalester College

Areas: Authoring and Publishing, Computer Graphics and Visual Arts, Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering

Stan Wagon uses Mathematica for his teaching and research in computational dynamics, number theory, and Mathematical logic, and has published several books. He also created a square-wheeled bicycle and a track to ride it on, which landed him a spot in Ripley’s Believe It or Not!, and competes in the Breckenridge International Snow Sculpture Contest with ice sculptures based on mathematical objects.

See Stan Wagon's Mathematica Demonstrations »

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